Pulling Your Own Teeth

Pulling Your Own Teeth

Even though it may sound very odd and downright compelling, a lot of people actually try to extract their own teeth. Toothache pain can be very painful and very frustrating, making you try anything to get relief. Depending on how bad the pain is, you’ll be more than willing to do just about anything you can to get the pain to stop. Abscesses or really bad cavities are among the worst, as the pain never seems to let up – no matter what you do.

In the old days, teeth were extracted by pliers, as there were no dentists around. During these times, people would get drunk on alcohol and then the teeth would be extracted. There was no such thing as anaesthesia back then, so it was impossible to locally numb the pain. These days though, local anaesthesia is the best way to numb a toothache before pulling the tooth. If you attempt to pull a tooth yourself, you’ll feel the pain no matter what you do.

There are situations however, in which you can pull your own teeth. Baby teeth for example, are acceptable to pull. Before you yank it out though, you should check on the age of when the tooth in question should be removed. If you wiggle the tooth around and it appears to be loose, then chances are it will come out without a problem. On the other hand, if you pull the tooth and it turns out to be an abscess, you’ll end up with a real problem and your hands and you’ll need to visit a dentist as soon as you can.

Another situation in which it is acceptable to pull your own teeth is when you have a severe case of gum disease. Gum disease can cause the socket and the bone to become extremely decayed, which will result in the destruction of the tooth. If the gum disease is severe enough, the tooth will be extremely loose and will come out without a problem. In some cases, the tooth can be almost unbearable to the touch. If you have gum disease and notice a loose tooth, you should be careful when pulling it. If you don’t do it properly or if you do it too soon, you could end up breaking the top of the tooth. If this happens, you’ll need to go to the dentist to have the remaining portion of the tooth cut out.

Even though a tooth may feel loose when you touch it, doesn’t always mean that you can grab a pair of pliers and rip it out. Teeth are very delicate. If you try to rip a tooth out with pair of pliers and make a mistake, you should end up doing more harm than good. Putting pliers in your mouth can also lead to an infection, which would send you to the dentist. Abscesses on the other hand, should never be dealt with on your own – you’ll need to go to a dentist to have him properly extract the tooth and give you some antibiotics to stop the infection.

To be on the safe side and avoid any potential problems that could easily arise, you should always go to the dentist if you have a toothache. No matter how bad the pain may be, you should never attempt to pull the tooth yourself. Your dentist can numb the area before he pulls the tooth, so you’ll feel no pain at all. He will also prescribe you some pain medicine and antibiotics as well, to help treat any infection you may have. If you attempt to pull the tooth yourself, you’ll only cause more problems in the end – and end up going to a dentist anyway.

Types of Gum Disease

Types of Gum Disease

Gum disease or also known as “periodontal disease” is a serious bacterial infection that damages the attachment fibers and the supporting bone that holds the teeth in the mouth. Periodontal disease (the word “periodontal” as a mater of fact means “around the tooth”) if left untreated can lead to tooth loss or can lead to heart problems like artery blockage or stroke. Periodontal disease has many forms. Listed below are the types of gum diseases:
Gingivitis
Gingivitis is the type of gum disease that is on its early stage. Gingivitis is frequently caused by poor oral hygiene which eventually will lead to the build up of plaque and tartar. Gingivitis, if diagnosed early, can be treated and reversed. Red, swollen and puffy gums are indications of gingivitis. A lot of factors contribute to this type of gum disease. Diabetes, smoking, aging, genetic predisposition, stress, poor nutrition, hormonal fluctuations and certain medications are just a few of the factors. If gingivitis is left untreated it will lead to other types of gum disease that is on the advanced stage.
Aggressive Periodontitis
Aggressive periodontitis is one of the types of gum disease that experience painless gingival inflammation and damage of the bone around the teeth. Others tend to consider the painless bleeding of the gums after cleaning the teeth as insignificant. This is considered one of the indications of this type of gum disease.
Chronic Periodontitis
Chronic Periodontitis is one of the types of gum disease that results in the inflammation within the attachment fibers and supporting bone damage. It is characterized by pocket formation or recession of the gums. Chronic Periodontitis is the most common types of gum disease. This type of gum disease is common among adults but it can also occur at any age. The progress of the attachment loss of this type of gum disease is commonly slow but episodes of swift progressions may tend to come about.
Periodontitis as a Manifestation of Systemic Disease
This is one of the types of gum disease that frequently occurs to individuals at young age. Periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease is frequently associated with other type of systemic diseases like diabetes.
Necrotizing Periodontal Diseases
Necrotizing periodontal disease is an infection that is distinguished by necrosis of gum tissues, periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone. These injuries are frequently detected in individuals with systemic conditions as well as, but not limited to HIV infections, malnutrition and immunosuppressions.

Despite the fact that some gum diseases can be very serious, it can be prevented by regular check ups. Regular dental check ups is one of the essential factor in the early detection of gum diseases and other serious dental problems that can be fatal.

Why Do Some People Get Tooth Abscess?

Why Do Some People Get Tooth Abscess?

Tooth abscess, also known as dental abscess or root abscess. This condition is by which pus is collected in the tissues surrounding a tooth as a result for bacterial infection. It usually occurs in the tissue surrounding the tooth that is decayed because of failed root canal. There are three types of tooth abscess. A periodontal abscess occurs in the tissue and bones of a tooth. Another one is the gingival abscess it occurs in the gum tissues without affecting the teeth. The last type of tooth abscess is the periapical abscess which occurs in the dental pulp or the root of the tooth. Having a tooth abscess is very painful, especially with the children when their pain tolerance is fairly low due to their young age.
Tooth abscess symptoms refer to the various symptoms known to a patient. Tooth abscess signs may refer to those signs which are only obvious to a doctor. There are complications that could set in, to include mild toothache in initial stages, or a swollen tooth. Other cases manifest minor dental pain, tooth sensitivity, loss of appetite, a swollen red face on one-side, fever and severe toothache in the later stages. If you consult a doctor earlier on the symptoms of the disease you will be diagnosed effectively with a tooth abscess. There are different types of tooth abscess that may affect to a person. Correct diagnoses is advised and required in order to help in providing the correct treatment to a patient. If you feel a slightest toothache maybe you ought to contact a doctor and this will be made possible. Some conditions of a tooth abscess may be diagnosed with an evident in your naked eye. There are also some cases that you need an x-ray which is detailed and visible on your teeth to ascertain the development of the tooth abscess.
In treating this tooth abscess the dentist starts by draining the infections then thoroughly cleaning the area. Then the dentist can smooth out the root surfaces of the tooth to have it healed and to help keep the infection from coming back. A root canal surgery can help the dentist to treat the tooth abscess. When it comes to your gum it need to firm and pink in color. If they red, soft or swollen it could be a sign that you have a gum disease. Penicillin is the common antibiotics that are normally prescribe by the dentist for the tooth abscess. It controls the tooth abscess extremely well with the most symptoms being alleviated within two or more days.
Self-treatment for a tooth abscess is not recommended as the condition requires a dentist treatment. Even if the tooth abscess becomes so infected that it bursts, the infections has not likely been eliminated. Bacteria from the ruptured of the tooth abscess may also spread in the different parts of the body so immediate medication is required.
Tooth abscess can be avoided by treating the cavities as early as you can. Avoiding an excessive amount of sugary foods can also help to prevent tooth abscess and by regular dental check up and brushing your teeth as well flossing can also help. Every time that you sense of having a tooth abscess, don’t hesitate to consult to your doctor immediately as you can in order to cure it as early as the first stage.

Common Issues Surrounding Periodontitis

Common Issues Surrounding Periodontitis

Are you suffering from periodontitis? Actually, this is among the top reasons why people lose their teeth or suffer from serious oral problems. It’s very common among adults aged thirty years and up, and even young adults who were not as mindful of their dental hygiene and care in their childhood and teenage years. This article aims to give you the information on the whole issue surrounding periodontitis, its treatments and diagnosis.
For starters, it is a gum infection that needs a thorough dental treatment. This will result to a tooth loss if not treated immediately. Periodontal disease or gum disease includes gingivitis and periodontitis. This type of gum disease is caused by bacterial infection due to poor oral hygiene. If you are suffering from gingivitis and properly treated, this will cause to periodontitis. Usually the condition causes gums to bleed and inflamed.
The symptoms of this periodontitis include red gums, sore gums, sour taste in the mouth, swollen gums, bleeding gums, sensitivity on teeth, pulling away of gums on teeth, teeth loss, dentures fitting poorly, difficulty chewing and biting and bad breath. Some people suffering from this serious oral disease usually experiencing few symptoms but if few symptoms could be felt, it is still best to consult your dentist to avoid tooth loss.
This condition usually arises from many factors. Mostly people having vitamin C deficiency usually suffer from bleeding gums and tooth loss. Plaque buildup is also one of the causes of periodontitis. There are also several types of periodontitis that you should consider and they are aggressive periodontitis, chronic, periodontitis related to some conditions and necrotizing periodontal disease.
Aggressive periodontitis is a bacterial disease of the teeth that occurs before the aged thirty five and usually common to prepubescent children. The first sign includes swelling of gum tissue and usually occurs with pain or sometimes there is no pain. Chronic periodontitis is the most common types of periodontitis and the inflammation occurs slowly and may result in tooth loss not properly treated. Some periodontitis can occur due to other health problems like heart diseases, diabetes and lung disorder.
If you are suffering from symptoms of periodontitis, make sure to visit your dentist immediately for proper treatment. During your visit your dentist will ask you about the history of your disease. Then the inspection of your teeth and gums is being observed especially the color and the firmness. Your dentist would also test your teeth for looseness and the fitness of your teeth together. Mostly, x-ray is requested to know if you are suffering from bone loss due to periodontitis. Your dentist would also use a periodontal probing in testing for gum diseases.
Prevent this to happen by brushing your teeth regularly for at least two to three times after meals. Use a soft bristled tooth brush and replace your toothbrush if there is wear. Soft bristled toothbrush is superior in removing plaque of your teeth. Brush your teeth effectively and take your time when brushing and also brush your tongue. Have regular floss and a regular checkup from your dentist.
Untreated periodontitis can lead to severe kinds of diseases. So, don’t be afraid to visit your dentist for proper treatment. As it’s often said, an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure. Besides, caring for your gums and teeth lessens the risks of heart and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as far more serious ailments that keep you from giving out your best smile more often!

Crowing About Toothache

Crowing About Toothache

When you take care of the natural teeth in your mouth, there will be no toothache to crow about. Toothache refers to the pain caused by tooth or jaw problems such as dental cavity, a cracked tooth, an exposed tooth root, gum disease, disease of the jaw joint, or muscle spasms when chewing. The severity of a toothache can range from mild to chronic excruciating pain. The pain may be aggravated by chewing, cold, or hot temperature of food or liquids taken through the mouth. Dental x-rays can help determine the cause whether the toothache is coming from a tooth or jaw problem.
It is possibility that a toothache may be caused by a problem not originating from a tooth or the jaw. Pain around the teeth and the jaws can be symptoms of diseases of the heart such as angina or heart attack, ear infections, and even a sinus infection. The pain of angina is usually located in the chest or the arm. However, in some patients with angina, a toothache or jaw pain are the only symptoms of their heart problem. Since infections and diseases of the ears and sinuses can also cause pain around the teeth and jaws, evaluations by both dentists and doctors become necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing “toothache.”
Dental cavity is the most common cause of toothache. Dental cavities are holes in the two outer layers of a tooth called the enamel and the dentin. These layers serve to protect the inner lining of the tooth tissue called the pulp, where blood vessels and nerves reside. Bacterial infections in the mouth convert simple sugars into acid which softens and dissolves the enamel and dentin, thus, creating cavities. Small shallow cavities usually do not cause pain and may be unnoticed by the patient. It is the larger deeper cavity that becomes irritated by bacterial toxins when food debris collect causing toothache. Foods that are cold, hot, sour, or sweet can also cause pain.
Dental filling is usually the treatment for small and shallow cavities, while larger cavity involves an on-lay or crown. For cavities that have penetrated and injured the pulp, treatment requires either a root canal procedure or extraction of the affected tooth. Pulp injury can lead to the death of pulp tissue, resulting in tooth infection or dental abscess. The root canal procedure involves removing the dying pulp tissue and replacing it with an inert material to save the dying tooth from extraction.
Gum disease or gingivitis is considered to be the second most common cause of toothache characterized by the inflammation of the soft tissue and abnormal loss of bone that surrounds the teeth and holds them in place. This condition is caused by toxins secreted by bacteria in “plaque” that accumulate over time along the gum line. Gum bleeding without pain is an early symptom of this disease while pain is of more advanced gum disease symptom as the loss of bone around the teeth leads to the formation of gum pockets. Advanced gum disease can cause loss of otherwise healthy teeth.
Early gum disease is treatment involves oral hygiene and removal of bacterial plaque. Thorough cleaning of the teeth and teeth roots called “root planing” and “subgingival curettage.” Root planing is the removal of plaque and tartar from exposed teeth roots while subgingival curettage refers to the removal of the surface of the inflamed layer of gum tissue. Both of these procedures are usually performed under local anesthesia and may be accompanied by the use of oral antibiotics to overcome gum infection or abscess. Follow-up treatment may include various types of gum surgeries. In advanced gum disease with significant bone destruction and loosening of teeth, teeth splinting or teeth extractions may be necessary.

Film Review: Under Our Skin (2008)

Have you ever been told “it’s all in your head”? Under Our Skin, a classic big-pharma conspiracy tale, is the story of what some call an epidemic of misdiagnosed and undiagnosed Lyme disease in America. It follows the lives of several Lyme patients as they seek controversial treatment for their illness by a few doctors whose livelihoods are continuously under fire for believing in the existence of chronic Lyme.

You would think that as someone who spends large amounts of time in the woods, I would be worried about contacting or having Lyme disease, but I never have been. My interest in this film came from my interest in medicine in general, especially those mysterious conditions which baffle  modern medical doctors including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, and even Autism. Lyme, often confused with or concurrent with other diseases, seems to fall into the same category as these, having widely variable neurological and immunological symptoms often written off as psychosomatic. As an attractive woman with chronic back pain, I particularly related to the female characters in the movie whose pain was discounted and difficult to convey because they “looked good”.

Much like Autistic Parents have organized around DAN (Defeat Autism Now) doctors, Lyme patients have organized a list of LLMD’s (Lyme Literate MD’s).  I was surprised however that the film focused almost entirely on conventional medicine for Lyme which includes ongoing doses of antibiotics. For an example of an alternative protocol see Steven Harrod Buhner’s book Healing Lyme.

The movie seemed to insinuate global climate chance might be the culprit behind the rising incidence of Lyme. I find myself more concerned with increasing environmental toxins which overwhelm the immune system’s ability to cope with additional invaders and are implicated in many of the diseases discussed above.